Tutorial #101: Getting started with Flurry Analytics in Android

Hello everyone!

Now-a-days, developers keep track of user activity and generate useful statistics about an application. Hence, analytics plays an important role in mobile applications. There are plenty of analytics solutions that exists in the market today. For example, ACRA is a library enabling Android Application to automatically post their crash reports to a GoogleDoc form. It is targetted to Android application developers to help them get data from their applications when they crash or behave erroneously.

Through this post, we will learn how to integrate the get started with the Flurry Analytics SDK in Android. The Flurry Analytics SDK provides you with the tools and resources you need to gain a deep level of understanding about your user’s behavior in your apps. Set up advanced analysis of complex events, with metrics, segments and funnels to better track your user’s habits and performance.

Pre-requisites: Eclipse IDE, Android SDK, Flurry Developer Account

Step 1: Sign up for Flurry developer account

First, you need to create a developer account by signing up over here. Once the account is created, download the required SDK. Now, login into your account and create a new application that will display all the analytical information.

Step 2: Create Android application project

Launch Eclipse IDE and a create a new Android application project called AndroidFlurryAnalyticsDemo with package name com.app.flurry.android. Copy the FlurryAnalytics.jar file inside the libs folder of your Android project.

Step 3: Initialize Flurry and simulate a crash

Create a new class called FlurryApplication that extends the Application class in Android. This class will initialize Flurry on application launch.

FlurryApplication.java

package com.app.flurry.application;

import android.app.Application;
import com.app.flurry.utils.AppConstants;
import com.flurry.android.FlurryAgent;

public class FlurryApplication extends Application {
	@Override
	public void onCreate() {
	super.onCreate();

        //set log enabled
        FlurryAgent.setLogEnabled(true);

        //set log events
        FlurryAgent.setLogEvents(true);
        
        // initialize Flurry
        FlurryAgent.init(this, AppConstants.FLURRY_API_KEY);
    }
}

Next, let us simulate a crash event in our Activity class as follows!

MainActivity.java

package com.app.flurry.main;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.view.View;
import android.widget.Button;
import com.app.flurry.android.R;
import com.app.flurry.utils.AppConstants;
import com.flurry.android.FlurryAgent;

public class MainActivity extends Activity {

	private Button m_objBtnPrint;
	private String m_strName = null;

	@Override
	protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
		super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
		setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

		m_objBtnPrint = (Button)findViewById(R.id.btnPrint);
		m_objBtnPrint.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {

			@Override
			public void onClick(View v) {
				// TODO Auto-generated method stub
				FlurryAgent.onEvent("click button");	
				simulateCrashEvent();
			}
		});
	}

	public void simulateCrashEvent(){
		try{
			m_strName.concat("This will result in null pointer exception");
		}catch(Exception ex){
			ex.printStackTrace();
			FlurryAgent.onError("error", "Error occurred on click of button", ex); 		
		}
		FlurryAgent.logEvent("print button clicked");	
	}

	@Override
	protected void onStart(){
		super.onStart();
		FlurryAgent.onStartSession(this, AppConstants.FLURRY_API_KEY);
	}

	@Override
	protected void onStop(){
		super.onStop();		
		FlurryAgent.onEndSession(this);
	}
}

activity_main.xml

<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    tools:context="${relativePackage}.${activityClass}" >

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/txt1"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="@string/hello_world" />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/btnPrint"
        android:layout_below="@+id/txt1"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="@string/print" />

</RelativeLayout>

AndroidManifest.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    package="com.app.flurry.android"
    android:versionCode="1"
    android:versionName="1.0" >

    <uses-sdk
        android:minSdkVersion="14"
        android:targetSdkVersion="19" />

    <!-- required permission -->
    <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.INTERNET" />
    <!-- optional permission - highly recommended -->
    <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE" />
    <!-- optional permission -->
    <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.ACCESS_FINE_LOCATION" />

    <application
        android:name="com.app.flurry.application.FlurryApplication"
        android:allowBackup="true"
        android:icon="@drawable/ic_launcher"
        android:label="@string/app_name" >
        <activity
            android:name="com.app.flurry.main.MainActivity"
            android:label="@string/app_name" >
            <intent-filter>
                <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />

                <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
            </intent-filter>
        </activity>

        <meta-data
            android:name="com.google.android.gms.version"
            android:value="@integer/google_play_services_version" />
    </application>

</manifest>

Save all changes and run the application on an Android device. If no errors occur, then you should see the following output from the dashboard page of the Flurry application.

crashes_page

events_page

users_page

Source code for this tutorial can be found over here

Reference: Flurry SDK Developer’s page

Karan Balkar About Karan Balkar
self proclaimed extraterrestrial fandroid, computer engineer, amateur gamer and die hard punk rock fan!

2 thoughts on “Tutorial #101: Getting started with Flurry Analytics in Android

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *